Newest Android Instant Apps SDK Are Making Apps Leaner and Faster

  Google introduced Instant Apps quite a while ago, and launched them back in May of this year. And as is the case with any first-generation product, there were some issues. Google touted Instant Apps as being faster than downloading and installing an app on your smartphone, but that wasn’t really the case in the real-world. Now with the Android Instant Apps SDK v1.1, these Instant Apps are getting faster and leaner. And this is because Google is making it so that these Instant Apps are only using the data needed to run the app on that specific device, thanks to device binaries. YOU SHOULD READ THIS!   As an example of how that would work, imagine you are using something like the ZTE Blade Force that just launched on Boost Mobile, which has a HD display. An Instant App wouldn’t need to download the additional data needed to make the app look good on something like the LG V30 which has a Quad HD+ display. Thus saving data and making the Instant App run even faster than before. It also wouldn’t download data needed for another chipset, say something from Intel, Samsung or NVIDIA, and would only download the language being used on that device, which would likely be English since it’s a Boost Mobile device. Google says that by doing this, it is able to shave about 10% off of what needs to be downloaded. And while that doesn’t sound like a lot of data, it actually is.  Now unfortunately, since this is all part of the new SDK, this won’t be seen in Instant Apps right away. It will require developers to go ahead and update their apps with these new features before users will start to see faster Instant Apps. But it is something that developers will likely update, since it’s a big step for Instant Apps. As Google has also extended the preservation of content from being only on Android Oreo, to now working on devices with Android Lollipop or higher, which is actually a big deal, seeing as over 80% of the Android world is using a device with Lollipop or later.  Source: Android Developers Blog Via: Engadget

Google introduced Instant Apps quite a while ago, and launched them back in May of this year. And as is the case with any first-generation product, there were some issues. Google touted Instant Apps as being faster than downloading and installing an app on your smartphone, but that wasn’t really the case in the real-world. Now with the Android Instant Apps SDK v1.1, these Instant Apps are getting faster and leaner. And this is because Google is making it so that these Instant Apps are only using the data needed to run the app on that specific device, thanks to device binaries.

YOU SHOULD READ THIS!


As an example of how that would work, imagine you are using something like the ZTE Blade Force that just launched on Boost Mobile, which has a HD display. An Instant App wouldn’t need to download the additional data needed to make the app look good on something like the LG V30 which has a Quad HD+ display. Thus saving data and making the Instant App run even faster than before. It also wouldn’t download data needed for another chipset, say something from Intel, Samsung or NVIDIA, and would only download the language being used on that device, which would likely be English since it’s a Boost Mobile device. Google says that by doing this, it is able to shave about 10% off of what needs to be downloaded. And while that doesn’t sound like a lot of data, it actually is.

Now unfortunately, since this is all part of the new SDK, this won’t be seen in Instant Apps right away. It will require developers to go ahead and update their apps with these new features before users will start to see faster Instant Apps. But it is something that developers will likely update, since it’s a big step for Instant Apps. As Google has also extended the preservation of content from being only on Android Oreo, to now working on devices with Android Lollipop or higher, which is actually a big deal, seeing as over 80% of the Android world is using a device with Lollipop or later.







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